Santa Clarita Valley History In Pictures
> BUSINESS

Computer-Generated Text Rendering Of:
Record-Press Newspaper.



SERVING: CASTAIC. THE CANYONS NEWHALL -SAUGUS
YALENCIA
VOLUME 3 NUMBER 16

FIREMEN battle in darkness and smoke to control the fire that destroyed the production secti.on of the Newhall Signal. Losses were heavy to build~g and contents.
Other Publishers Help

Morning Fire Destroys Newhall Signal Building
Arson was ruled out late in or around the newspaper's building belching fire from one Monday in the disastrous fire dark room and was due to end to the other. Firemen *hich struck the Newhall Sig-faulty wiring. speculate the blaze may have n\ai in the early hours of First report of the fire had about a 20-minute head Saturday morning. Arson in-was turned in by Deputy Sherstart. vestigators of both the Sher-iffs at 1:39 a.m. Saturday The fire was stubborn and iffs Department and the County morning. Fire equipment required over a half hour to
Fire Department arrived at reached • the plant in the next the same conclusion, that the few minutes and found the flre more than likely started Railroad Ave. wing of the
heavy and acrid.
Central Committee Elects Officers

Officers for the 1969-70 vice chairman; Kevin Lynch term of the Republican 62nd is secretary and Bill Hays Assembly District central of . Burbank was retained as
-Committee were elected Mon-~i;easurer. day night at the first general . , Joe Newnham of Lancaster
meeting of the county com-and Haig KehiayaJ;). 'of Sand .mtttee in Los Angeles.
Canyon are . dlSO members,Fred Trueblood Jr. was re
There is one vacan¢y in the

.elec;ted chairman. steve Ro.gero •of-Palmdale was chosen seven-man committe~.
bring under control. Dense
clouds of smoke further com
plicated efforts to bring the
blaze under control, and sev
eral firemen became ill.
.The production end of the
newpaper was completely dis
troyed. Justiwriters, head
liners, camera equipment and
supplies were wiped out and
the building was gutted.

The front or Sixth street portion of the building was saved but suffered smoke and water damage.
The fire department estim
ated the damage at $50,000
for loss of the building and
contents.
The Signal w i 11 continue
production, its publisher an
nounced. U has received of
fers of assistance . from ser

eral newpapers including the scheduled. Record Press and owners of The Antelope Valley Freethe building 1said the plant way which has laid fallow for would be rebuilt as soon as several yearswill be tied into possible. 'the Los Angeles freeway sys-
other fires during the week tern. It is planned during the included a rash of brush and year, according to the state grass fires. Three of them report, to begin the extenoccurred in San Francisquito sion of the Antelope Valley Canyon near camp 17 and two route 6.8 miles inasouthwesjuveniles were charged with terly direction from a point starting them. . east of Solemint where it now
Friday a grass fire between ends to San Fernando Road. Peachland School and. Apple 1he route bypasses SoleStreet in Happy valley was mint to the east, sweeps to quickly suppressed. Its cause the east ofthe Princess Homes was unknown. development and then closely
,------------parallels Route 14 until it
r_eaches the interchange. Construction of a portion of
Downtown
an interchange for the future
Route 126 freeway is included

Newhall
in the project. Estim::i.ted cost . of the project is $12,700,000,


Merchant,
and $3,300,000 will be budgeted in the next fiscal year. Part of the above project
are c o n d u c tin g a

includes a spectacular earth post -holiday s a 1 e.
moving project to extend the Pages 5; .,6 and 7
Golden State Freeway (Inter- state 5)two miles south toward
contain their special
the Sylmar area. The job in
sale message.

cludes building aninterchange with the Antelope Valley Free__~--------J.way and constructing this free-



A New Era In OU Exploration?
WJLDCA Toil exploration begins anew. This huge rig back of the California Highway -Patrol headquarters will probe deep in the earth in search of petroleum, once the Iifeblood of_ this .valley.
Transportation Agency Says A_V Freeway Work -Set
California's Transportation Agency in a year-end omnibus report disclosed a freeway construction program, part of which will be of vital effect to his valley. Funds are now apparently available for new highway construction in 1969, and 64 majorhighway projects in the statehave been way .2.3 miles northeasterly eral new stopsigns in the North from the. interchange to San Oaks area. Fernando Road (Route 126). Traffic on Esterbrook AveCost of this project will be in nue will so.on be required to excess of $27,000,000. . stop 'before entering Delight

County road projects in adStreet, traffic on Newhouse dition to a multimillion dolstreet wm be required to stop lar Lake Hughes venture albefore entering Esterbrook
ready announced, include sev-Continued on Page 3
Three , Youngsters Injured By Valley Auto Mishaps
The first week. of Jan\lary car driven by .Paul Brunton produced three pedestrian acof Saugus. Brunton said he cidents in the valley, all of was westboundwhen he noticed
them involving children. None something hit the car and of them were seriously inflash by. He at first thought jured, but the close grouping it to be an animal, of pedestrian accidents is unThe Martinson child had
precedented according to the been seen running into the CHP. street many times according to a witness. The youngs
On New.Years Day tiny Hea
ter."was treated at SantaClar
ther Ann Zopelis was riding ita Hospital.
her tricycle in Ridgevale 1
Monday Joes Anderson 7Drive when she was struck was injured when he ran 'int~by a vehicle driven by Harthe side of a car driven byold Amerson. Amerson said Shirley Ann Proctor of Sauhe was westbound on Ridgegus, She told investigatingvale at about ten mph with officers she had obserted thethe sun in his eyes. He said Anderson boy and a c'ompanvisor when the ac.cident hapion on the shoulder • of thepened. ,The child was taken road. The companion stopped to Santa Clarita Hospital with at the road but Joes appearedhead injuries.
to put his head down and
Saturday four-year old stated to run. She said she stephen Martinson received swerved but the boy continued minor scrapes and bruises into the side of her car. He when he dashed into Rochelle also was treatedat SantaClar
Drive and was stru.ck by a ita: Hospital.
..

Argosy Oil Company.
Spuds In Deep Test
Exploratory Well
The history of this valley pad leveled off above the CHP
has, for almost a century, station, and located so as to
been wrapped in the search avoid' blocking natural drain
for black gold. Following age. Dr'" .,g time is es
a lapse of almost 15 years timated by \he operators to
in that search, a new, major be 30 to 40 days to reach
effort may be in the offing the Mi,.,1.:-;re sands it is look.:
as a deep-test well has been ing for
spudded in directly behind the T:-,e area is not new, to
California Highway Patrol petroleum exploration.
station south of Lyons Avenue Humble. Oil Co. also ran a deep
and parallel to Interstate 5. test a mile or so northeast
The well, a prospect of Arof the present. venture some
gosy Oil Company of Bakerstime ago.
field, is being drilled by ArIt is not only ironic but
ro'.?{head Exploration Co., part altogether fitting that the re
of agroup named MACPETH. birth of petroleum exploration
This 'organization has two in this valley should fall to
other outfits, Del Wood and La the Sherman family. Dick
Goree operating on the Gulf Sherman, whose brother Bud
Coast of Texas, is now heading the. new oper
Geological prospect work ation, was considered one of
for the new test has been done. the best petroleum geologists
by Bud Sherman, a brother in California. In the late
of the I ate Dick Sherman, '30s and early '40s he prowled
whose instinct for oil and the Santa Susana Ridge, finally
genius for geogogy opened i.tp deciding on the potrero
major high grade oil resourcountry facing the Upper San
ces in this valley a number ta Clara River.
of years ago. His geology was exact and
The well is a deep probe his drillers penetrated rich
wildcat p 1 ann e d to reach oil zones. The Barnsdall
depths of 11,500 to 12,000 Field was born. It produced
feet into the earth. rt is m1illions in oil. Later he.
looking for deep-zone oil and moved across the river and
producing formations that may located the oil field for Homer
lie above these lower levels. and Russell Havenstrite that
It is described by its oper-. Union Oil now owns, Other
ators as a "deeper zone strafinds were made farther up
tegic shot." the formation and more mil
The drilling rig is an uplions. tn oil were taken out.
to-date, heavy duty machine All this had a very deep
and has been installed on a bearing on this valley's econ
omy of that period. The now
of petroleum bolstered the
faltering economy of the New
hall Ranch. .rt provided an
undreamed-of bonanza for
End of

The Line
many small ranchers alongthe' petroleum structure~d it_ Sale of the assets ofthe Rec
Continued on Page 3 ord-Press to the Newhall Sig- nal was annou~ced today by o.
R. Tucker, publisher. The lie interest in the face of salebecomeseffective immed-strong. public reaction, admitiately. The sale price was ting, however, that he had disnot disclosed. agree ment with some pos. iAccording to Tucker, the , itions taken in the past. His fife which hit Signal plant and own philosophy encompasses of\!ices last Saturday and the the need for newspaper to be resultant need for production fear 1es s in presenting the facilities and space bythe Sig-facts, obje'ctive and without nal precipitated discus -discrimination. sions which led to the sale, In addition, he said "for Tucker also indicatedthatlack this reason, he believes that of capital for expansion needs The Signal will continue to at the Record-Press was a gain the support of the comfactor in his decision to sell. munity and will be a good watch
Tucker purchased the Re-dog for the .people.'' At the cord-Press last July from Pa~ same time, he urged support Onorato and Darien Deither. of The Signal. "Disagree if Established in September of you will," he said, "but h;lp 1966 as a tabloid, Tucker it grow and grow with it.'•: As changed the format to a stan-a newsp~pbr grows so grows dard s,ize upon purchase. The the corrtm~nity it' serves." P a Per has grown steadily Unstated but known by close since, this issue representing associates to be a contributing 300% growth during the six factor in his decision to sell months period. Itwasthe rap-\are reasons of health. Durid growth and lack of capital ing recent months, he has con
1
that entered into the decision '
;tided with friends that he may to sell. be faced with major surgery
In.making the announcement in the not too distant future, to his employees late Tuesday, the nature of which was not Tucker said that all discus-disclosed. sions, working out the details Tucker and his wife will of the agreement, and all docu-continue to live in the area at ments pertaining thereto, present. Terms of the sale were finalized within a twenty-provide for his services with
four hour period. The Signal in' an advisory
In discussi.n g the sale, capac tty in reestablishing Tucker who has had many production facilities along years ofpublishingexperlence with other matters.
said that the establishment of a s e con'd newspaper in this stage of development was an
This Weelcs
extremely difficult, Hnot impossible financial challenge. While he said that the Rec


IICGU PRC§SI
ord -Press could have sur~ vived indefinately, his decision to sell was made after

Circulation
searching in vain for needed capital for expansion and improvement of the product.
He also disclosed his secret admiration for The Signal for having the fortitude to speak out on matters of pub









PAGE 2 RECORD PRESS -Wednesday, January 8, 1969
q
,.


Golden Oaks Adult$chool

Arroyo. Seco Junior High Campus
WEDNESDAY TIME ROOM Parent & Child
7-10 305

Relationship Dressmaking 7-10 101 Government -Calif. 7-10 306 U.S. History II 7-10 303 Income Tax
7-9 302

Preparation Gymnasg;c:i f.or 7-9 Exr.
. e th THURSDAY Aviation Ground 7-10 302
School English -h\gh 7-10 303
schoo Reading/Spelling/
7-9 306

Vocabulary Basic Education 7-10 307 Contemporary
7-10 404
Crafts

Friendly Valley Center 19326 W. Ave. of the Oaks -Newhall
MONDAY TIME ROOM Current Affairs 7:30 -9:30 EC Dressmaking 9 -12 am EC Dressmaking 1 -4 . EC
TUESDAY Oil & Water Color 1 -4 EC
WEDNESDAY Knitted Fabrics 9 -12 am EC Knitted Fabrics 1 -4 EC Oil & Water Color 9 -12 am EC
THURSDAY Oil & Water Color 7 -10 EC Spanish 7 -10 EC
Arroyo Seco Junior High Campus 27135 No. Seco Canyon Road -Sa1,1gus
MONDAY TIME-
Traffic Survival 7-10
Contemporary Crafts 7-10
Knitted Fabrics 7-10

Government -Calif. 7-10
U.S. History II • 7-10 Gymnastics for 7-9
Health 'IUESDAY Trafic Survival 7-10 Oil & Water Color 7-10 Spanish 7-10 English -high 7-10
school Reading/Spelling/
7-9

Vocabulary Basic Education 7-10
Wm. S. Hart High School Campus
WEDNESDAY TIME ROOM
English-for ForeignSpeaking 7-10 M-4
Citizenship 7-10 M-3
Elementary Accounting 7-10 C-6

Applied Engineering
Shorthand
Texas has about one-fifth the sheep in the United States.
-----------,
f!:/itJe rpjj~
~
de

~~o/1/}
Qfi®~:
When it comes to perma. nent waves, don't accept the
ordinary! Exclusive ESKA • PROTEIN WAVE enriches your hair with precious protein ... gives it extraordinary beauty and >manageability. Call us soon for this finest
of all permanent waves
For An Appointment
Phone 259-1950
SALLY'S

BEAUTY SALON

OPEN,
DAYS A WEEK
243631/i
San-Fernando Rd.
(Rear}
7-10 D-1 7-10 C-2

Carel of Thanks
The seven members of the
v.E. Kobel family would like
to thank each and every one who helped to make our first Christmas in the state of
California the best one we as a family have had. We also want to thank EVERY ONE at the SANTA CLARITA HOSPITAL from the staff of GRE.AT DOCTORS and WONDERFUL NURSES: and NURSES AIDS; also the wonderful people that are patients, who along with other wonderful people who gave from their heart such t h i n g s as t o y s , food, and clothing.
THANKS TO ALL OF YOU and GOD BLESS EACH ONE OF YOU
V. E. Kobel and Family
ROOM 604
404
101 306 303 ~ Exr.
604
404 305 303
306
307
Conservation of
7-10
Natural Resources
THURSDAY Adv. Typing/ Office 7:30-9:30
Procedures Dressmaking 7-10 Knitted Fabrics 7-10 Technical Illustration 7-10
_Welding 7-10
Sierra Vista Junior High Campus 19425 W. Stillmore St. -Saugus
TUESDAY TIME ROOM
Ceramics 7-10 1003
THURSDAY
Ceramics 7 -10 1003

Val V~rde Recreation Center San Martinez Rd. & Chiquito -Saugus Monday and Wednesday Ceramics & Oil Painting 10 am -2pm '



NEWHALL-SAUGUS FIX-IT SHOP
'-ERVING NEWHALL, SAUGUS '
Now OPEN
CASTAIC, THE CANYONS & VALENCIA '!' '..{
Repairing of Al( Home & Shop Tools & \ Appliances. ,VERY REASONABLE RA TES
Experienced, Fast & Reliable Service. All Work Guaranteed for 30 Days on Parts and Labor.
Ken & Dee Ranum Phone (805) 259•8754 after 5:30 P.M. Owners FOR FA'ST DEPENDABLE SERVICE
24009 Race St. NEWHALL
F-3 •
' '
C:-;3
G~l Library IA-1 11\:.2

SANTA CLARITA
Convalescent Hospital
CONNECTED TO
.Our General Hospital
*
Activities organized by Director of Recreation

*
Organized Women's Aux,iliary and Candy stripers


*Approved by Federal, st'ate and County Governments/
*
Individual room' air conditioning

*
Registered Dietician providing special and thera-,. peutic diets

*
Does not discriminate against race, color, creed1 or origin.


(;;#5 .
SANTA CLARITA HOSPITAL ,
21704 W. Soledad Canyon Road, Saugus 259-2220
Christ The Savior
Muhammed The Comforter
Baha'u'II ah The Glory Of God
BAHA'I FAITH fireside discussion this Friday night

Wm. S. Hart High School Campus 24825 N. Newhall Ave. -Newhall
MONDAY TIM:E ROOM
Adv. Typing/OfficeProcedures 7~30 9:30 C-3
Basic Electronics 7-10 IA-6
C~servit:ren ofatura esources 7-10 F-3
First Aid 7-9 B-~

show. versary recently.






NEEDED
Newhall Area
..~
,.M. .~ "' •'ti:. ...C ,l!c _. -: . -"
int. anyon Area


CALL

PRCSS



259-4142
PAPER
BOYS
TUESDAY Legal Problems of
7-10

Homeowners Typing
7-10
Welding

7-10 '\Y_oodshop/Cabinetry
7-10

,or

Older mothers are more The Univer.slty of Paris, likely to have twins, statistics eetebrated its 80oth anni


RECORD PRESS .-Wednesday, January B, :1969 PAGE 3
and with a stake he had built up, returned, drilled a well
Too much rest seems to be
~ tiresome as too much work.

Argosy••• Co-ord Council Tips for Efficient Use of Gas Heating
and hit oil. Butwho now owned Continued from Page 1
title? Years had passed by Most parts of the South-and Yant's oilfield became Meets Thurs. land have already felt the in-(4) Close the flue on fire-.pointed ,out that gas bills do waa soon, to provide an enorin lease money, bonus money an oil drillers no-man's-land.

itial chm of winter's blus-place when not in use. An not increase in directpropor
and royalty money. mous taxable assessed valuaDrillers inte rse ct e d each The first meeting oftbe new tery weather. And .if the open chi rn ney allows the tion to usage because the cus-Oil wai;; produced here but
Firewood

tiop Jn oil reserves that for others holes. There were year of the SOiedad Township home's he:n,:ed air to escape torner•s unit price of gas is
it was a "finger" geological
FRE'E DELIVERY 25903O.C

all intent and purpose built bulldozer duels and shotswere Coordinating council wpl be weather forecasters are ac-without -benefit to occupants. reduced with increased the William s. Hart Union High formation. The field died held Thursday, January 9, 12 curate, the corning winter will (5) Close heating regis-surnption. con~,
LANDSCAPE NURSERIES
fired. It was calledMadMoun
23923 SAN FERNANDO RD

.School. It was alsothe mother in a strange way. Oil was noon fo the banquet room of be colder than the -past few ters in unoccupied rooms.
tain, later to be tempered to

lode of the Castaic School being produced on the Arcadia
Confusion Hill. Topper's, 23802 Lyons Avenue seasons. csf If there is a roof top •----------
structure and shipped out by

mslrict. _ There were other dlJ;covin Newhall. president Jeriann Southern Californians fight cooler close the baffles dur-DECOIt, ATIVJ --Tnis was not all. In the night. A pumper on this eries •.•the castaic Hills anci Bowman will preside. winter's cold and dampness ing the'winter months. ROCK
well, more interested in a N~wf{all. Oil rigs rose on night on the town, opened the
late '40s Sherman moved into petroleum on the Sheriffs
Honor Farm near castaic.

th~ now quiet and sedate Arvalves to fill the tanks early. And there are memories
~ dia Street n!:!ighborhood ~f In this operation the gaspresof Pico Canyon, still proNewhall. The fever was on. sure was lost, and the wells
ducing, and the star Oil ComIt is conservatively estimated never recovered. The boom pany •.• Bard, Mentry, ttie old now that over $1 million was died. Even old mother Stannames., but always the search
poured out In that short time dard Oil quit-claimed longfor oil. Bus Sherman is
term leases and pulled out.

but the latest.
The last oil boom occurred STACEY'S SCHOOL around 1950 w~en one of the

Agency•••
.,; most colorful figures ever .to

• of hit this valley returned. His " SELF DEFENSE name was Milford Yant. He Continued from Page 1 was a short, energetic man, . Avenue, andtraffic on Hardes
.".:, 259•7882 or 259-5774
who in the 1920's, asthe story
After 4 p.m.
goes, got into some .trouble
24619 Arch Street
,., ~ with the law regarding ten
f
Specializing in Kung Fu, square-foot oil properties in
Karate, and
those hills near that point
where Placerita canyon Road
intersects Highway 14.
After World war II, Yant, divested of his legal tro~les


.------------------------.1the education ofyour children, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8th thru 14th the costs involved, and the
Offered By

roles of your local Boards of "A CLASSIC! ASHOCKER -"'BESJ ACTRESS-' HONORS Trustees, then plan to attend
Telephone co.
the Thursday meeting of your

BEYOND BELIEF!" -uP, TO MIA FARROW."
Hearst News Serv,ce focal coordinating council and
become a better informed
Starts 8:45
P acific Telephone main
Paramounl PiclurE:sPreserns
citizen.
tains a speakersbureau within
"WILL-PENNY"
Miafarrow
its Public Relations Division.
In a William CastleProduction
Charlton Heston
This bureau provides free il
Rosemary's Baby
Joan Hackett
Walter Mikkelsen lustrated programs to meet
........, JohnCassavetes
IN COLOR
the needs of service clubs,
Technicolor A Paramount Picture
s.chools ..and business and
Suggested for MatureAudiences
Starts 6:45
Death came to Walter Mik~ social organizations in the

11------------------------1kelsen of Newhall, Decernb_
er. communities the corn pany

ffsWA p MEE TJJ
27. Few details are avail-serves. ., able. He was botn February . One of the many "talk
14. 1904, in Nebraska. demonstrations'' the bureau

,' : • EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY The remains were for-offers to the public is . _ warded by Hilburn•s Funeral " NORAD.'' In a program of
7:00 AM-~ -3:00 PM Chapel to Evan Funeral Horne national interest, the audience k • h in Patterson, California for takes a color slideoftheCom-
FREE


ty Avenue will be required to stop before entering Ermine Street, re Po rts Supervisor Warren Dorn.


BOX'OFFICE OPENS 6:15 SHOW TIME 6:4S
Adults $1.2S-Jrs. 12-14 with Parents '50c-Under 12 FREE
•• 2 Co e-s -wit P,aid Admission i
_______________________ serv ces.
The new regulations were . authorized by the Board ofsupervisors. The County Road Departrn ent will post the
signs within. ten
necessary
days.

This month's program con-in various ways, but most (7) Replace filters on for-
LOMITA

cerns education and the forth;. .simply turn on their furnaces, ced air furnaces. A clogged Per Skip
$495

corning election for qualified set their thermostats and wait filter impedes the flow of air Load
GRAVEL
school board members. In in solid comfort for warm and reduces the efficiency of
Covers Appr6x. 80 to 100 Ft.
April of this year, resi\ients weather. the heating system. Clear
w111 have the responsibility of Mindful of the fact that an accumulated lint anddust from GRIMES CANYON electing seventeen members' overwhelming rn a j ority of wall and floor furnaces b~ to posltions on several Boards. Southlander use natural gas turning off the pilot and using Multi-Color Per Skip $675 of Trustees within the Wil-to heat S. L. vacuum cleaner. Follow reLoad
their homes,
ROCK

llarn s. Hart School District. Reynolds, manager of South-lighting instructions provided
Covers A PJl'&X. ao to 100 Ft.
The final date for filing of ern California Gas Co.'s East with the appliance. candidates is February 20. San Fernando ValleyDivision, The gas company official BUILDERS this w.eek reminded area re-reminded homeowners that
SUPPLY

According to Mrs. Bowman, sidents of seven ways of get-their winter gas usage can
several school administrators

ting more value from their be four to seven times as
and board members will be

heating systems. much as during warm weather present to answer queStions, His key points were: and naturally results in a
express opinions, and discuss ( )

1 Turn your thermostat higher gas bill. However, he
issues. With the closing date down at night. Your heating for filing of board candidates system will maintain a corn-only alittle more than a rnonth f9rtable nighttime tempera-away, persons wishing to seek tur!", while you sleep under
a position are urged to sub-wartn blankets. mil their applications as soon (2) ' Draw drapes over slid-as possible. tng, glass doors and large

Members of the coordina-window areas to reduce the ting council will learn the loss of heat through glass. an'swers to such questions as }Vhy heat the great outdoors? who is eligible to file, what (3) Fix leaky hot water abilities and attitudes are re-faucets. It takes more gas quired of a board member, to heat the cold winter water, an<;! . the duties and respon-so why waste it? sibilities of not only an individual member, but of the
Program
board as a whole.
If you are concern,ed with bat operations Center at the
North Americlll) Afr Defense
c o , and Headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colorado.
Illustrations describe _the vast defense communications network including the DEW LINE, WHITE ALICE, SAGE and others. These.systems
serve as eyes and earsto funnel information to the command post 'from Iceland, Greenland, Siberia, Cuba and other countires.
Highlight of the program is an amplified long distance telephone call to the duty offi

.cer for an up-to-the-instant briefing on air and sea acti-_ vity over and around the North American continent.
Int ereste d groups are
-invited to call Arroyo Division Public Relations, 247-8611 for further information.
'
TwoNewhall
MJn Finish Training

Kenneth Harms and James Nielson Jr. both of Newhall wer~ two of 62 new county firemen reporting for duty in fire stations this week followi,ig eight weeks ofintensive training at the L.A. County
Fire Department Training
Center.
Cltief Engineer Keith E.

Klinger presented badges to .:he firemen as members of thei:r, families looked on.
' I

During their eight weeks of training, the, recruit firemen were assigned to the Training Center on a 24-hour shift basis. They were instructed in the funclarnentals of fire fighting, laying hose lines, laddering buildings, proper use of the numerous pieces of rescue and fire fighting equipment, and maintenance of the station and equipment.
The men participated in the extinguishrnent of several major fires as part of their
training.
Each recruit was awarded

Valley.Federal's exhibit of rareif antique clocks ' from'. around the world...

Relax. Take time out. Come to any of Valley Federal Savings' six offices and relax in time with a collection of antique clocks from around the world ... Rare ... Unusual ... Priceless . .. Clocks that are housed in
cathedrals. Clocks that are animals. Clocks that chime ... Move ... Revolve
... Dance .. . and predict weather. Spend a little time with us, and open an account ... and a chance to win
a drawing for a man's or woman's Bulova ~rist watch.
.'.. Yoµ'll have a good time.

'
-
6 college units in Fire Science
NORTHRIDGE

VAN NUYS (Home Office) CANOGA PARK
by East Los Angeles College,

AUTO STEREO & TAPE CENTER 6842 Van Nuys Blvd. 21901 Sherman Way 9055 Reseda Blvd. ,
:, and Chief Klinger urged the 26840 SECO CANYON ROAD (I'? Bouquet Shopping Center) new firemen to continue their NEWHALL SAN FERNANDO LANCASTER formal education. 24200 N. San Fernando Rd. 402 S. _Brand Blvd~ 44433 10th St. West at J Harms will go to station 11
CLOSED SUNDAYS DAilY FROM 10 AM To 8 PM



.PAGE 4 'RECORD PRESS:-Wednesday, January 8, 1%9
RICORD PR£SS I
Dedicated to the Develooment of the Entire Upper Santa Clara River Valley
Published each Wednesday by ORLU Publications, Int.,
24519 Spruce St., ,Newhall. Callf111rnl a, 91321, Ph crie 2594142.
O.R. TUCKER-EDITOR & PUBLIS.ttER
FRED TRUEBLOOD, JR>MANAGING EDITOR
-Member of
1988
CALIFORNIA NEWSPAPER PUl~INC.
C_an't Escape from the Flu

If you've been thinking of leaving Calif. ornia and going south to escape the flu, forget it.
A hot climate is no guarantee against runny noses, sore throats, clogged sinuses and all fhe other nagging aches and pains of what the medical trade terms respiratory infections.
In fact, it could be just the opposite, ,according to a four-year , study of student ailments conducted jointly ~y the University of Wisconsin and the University of the Philippines and reported in the Wisconsin Research Newsletter.
Both schools kept track of the causes of all admissions to universfty infirmaries. Results showed that in the topical Phllip~ pines, almost 50 out of every 1,~00 students were hit by respiratory infections on a yearly
average, twice ' the sniffle incidence among
students in wintry Wiscpnsin.
Weather was a factor at both schools -illness peaks occurred during the rainy season in the Philippines and the cold winter months in Wisconsin --but only because it kept students cooped up in crowded classrooms and dormitories, hothouse atmospheres facilitating the spreadof cold-cau~ing viruses.
In short, the danger lies not in the wea.:. ther outside but the company you keep in.side. Which may be some cold comfort
to snowbound millions in the East.

As can be noted elsewhere in our news columns, this issue of the Record -Press will be the last one. It isn't easy to say for it always pains. us to read of a newspaper that has come to the end of the road and cease to be, much less be a party to the demise.
Circumstances, as well as the turn of events, however, dictate that this step is in the best interests of all concerned. We sincerely believe this to be true, being one of the determining factors in arriving at our final decision. '

When we came into this valley last July, we did so with the knowledge that our finances were limited with respect to the ultimate needs that would be required to do the job that should be done. Admittedly, we were overly optimistic as to what could be done with. limited available resources. We found capital hard to come by and, thus, our / expansion needs could not be met as we had hoped. .
The untimely and unfortunate fire that hit the Newhall Signal last Saturday precipitated discussions th~t led to the decision

to sell the Record -Press facilities to the Signal. The Signal was badly in need of production equipment which was available at the Record-Press. Hence, it was only natural that we mutually discuss the realities that both parties knew existed and would continue for years to come. /
We both recognized that the econo.mic factor clearly indicated the need for onlyone

newspaper in the area. Too~ we also knew that for a newspaper to properly serve an area, it must be financially sound. Neither could become that sound until one or the other succumbed to economics.
w e also feel that a newspaper that has no enemies has no friends. Any newspap~r that is . worth its salt will cr eate enemies if it does the job that it is supposed to do. It is a necessary ingredient if the public interest is served. What better watchdog can a community have than a newspaper with eyes and ears with fortitude -to keep the general public informed? .
Since coming into the community, we have observed first hand the needs of this area.

.we would have liked to... have been a part in helping the community meet those needs but we sufferect growing pains without the means to see it through.
•You're Polite: You Never Lose Your Cool: You Enforce .the Law With a Firm But Gent/e Hand!'

t
' I

SHOULD LAND BE USED .MORE WISELY?
' ~
ly Harry Bell President , Newhall-Saugus Board of Realtors
The valJie of land in our urban areas is fast reaching a level where, zoning boards, planning commissions, economists, and others concerned with it as a basic commodity are examining new concepts.
Why, for instance, require 35 feet of wasted living space between the front of a house and the street? Granted a
front yard creates an air ot,,t'?.,., spas:tous Jivirig and may l;>e .1 actively enjoyed by many..,,, owners. Still, is it justified?
Would a family be just as content living on a smaller lot, but I converting all of it to living space? Some newly planned and built communities are using that concept and finding ,that •the answer is "Yest" In these, the house is placed on the lot where it is most useful, the only limitation being the riature of the dwelling: single famlly, multiple umts, etc.
J
The. result is that many houses are being placed r_ight on the lot line, creating patio living that is an integral part of the living plan. This con
. cept, of course, is not new in the world. Many, countries have built that way for cen. turies, their fronts against the sidewalk, no space between houses, livingquarters around a courtyard. Except in the most densely populated areas
of our 'cities, it has not been much used in this country.
The cost of land is the key pressure just now to considering this method ofbuilding. It would not be surprising,
however; if the relative scarcity of land itself would soon begin to exert pressure, also.
How long can we continue
sprawling outward as our
population increases? How'

much cro.t,laPd can we consume for frhbt yards befor.e the sheer, need ;for food calls a halt?
So far we cannot say food shortage is seriously inprospect in our country. We can, however, say that the cost of servicing urban sprawl is n~t only contributing heavlly to land cost through taices, it
is becoming a burden the pro- perty owner cannot easily bear.
As a Realtor, Ihavebecome
increa~ingly aware of the need to prevent the cqst of owning r eal estate from going sohigh as to disco11rage home owner~ ship. The problem is manyfaceted, invloving taxation methods, employment problems, transportation, schools, and many other aspects.
E'ssentialiy, we are facing the need in our country of reducing the cost of housing for the average low to middle income family in .relation to the famlly's income. Housing costs cannot rise rriuch above 20% ofincome without creating an imbalance that eventually

. will have to be corrected. \
,This is why the townhouse • concept is being seen more often in California, where row houses with common walls allow higher density living on the land whlle stm not converting to appartments.
The Jotal lot llving mep
ioned earlier is a compromise that allows single family dwellings with the same
amount of privac:y or even more privacy than in our tra-. ditional suburban housing developments.
Some of the newly planned communities using this concept are even carrying it a step further and using part of the land saved to provide s~rollways and pocket parks
. between the backs of the lots, unmarred by automobiles or delivery trucks.
They are interesting con
. cepts that could well affect you and me before many more years have passed. If we look at them carefully, should they be proposedin our community, and use them :wisely, we could • very well increase the satisfaction derived -from owning a home, at the same time reducing its cost enough to put it within reacp of more of our people.

LAWS IM~LIED IN
CONTR~CTS
Mrs. Johnson had made a contract to lease an apartment. 9ne day slie leaned against a balcony railing. It gave way and she fell and hurt herself badly. She sued the landlord for negligence.
In most leases the tenant not the landlord -has the legal
"Your mom'.s a comedian, duty to keep a place in re-
too, I see-'' ' pair. Although the law ofCalifornia by statute puts the duty of r epair on the landlordifthe premises iµ-e for human habitatiol;l, the parties can agree
agree with everything that is printed therein,
otherwise. Even when the but, you must agree that the community's . place needs repair and the best interest will be served if everyone is landlord keeps it in repair, kept on their toes. the tenant usually has to report to t~e landlord any work that
As goes a newspaper, so goes a com
needs to be done.
munity. Hence, support your ownc.ommunity
The lease said that Mrs.
newspaper and help it to grow. In so doing,
Johnson had to keep the place
you and your.community will grow with it. in repair, and report to the Finally, a special word of thanks to all landlord any needed repair work. This she had f~l~d to do.
the nice peop,le who have given us help, adv~ce
Ordinarily this fact would
and oth~rwise assisted in making our stay
have 'ended the lawsuit. But
in_ this valley a pleasant one. And to our
another factor entered. A

LAW IN' ACTION
. In selling the Recor~-Pr ess plant and valuable and loyal employees,overworked anq county ordinance said hand-
equipment to The Signal, we . feel that a

underpaid, we regret the fact that this .mbve rails and balconies could be better and stronger newspaper will result became necessary. You are the best and only so high, and had to be .and €hereby serve the best interests of the ancho'r."ed solldly.
we sincerely hope thatwe have the opportunityvalley over all. True, you will not a,lways to work with you again. Adios. in this case, the court
agreed that the county laws and building codes were, in effect, unw'ritten parts of Mr s. :fohnson's lease. Where the lease contract and thelaws differed, the faws wouldprevail anyhow. So she had a case against the landlord ~fter all. -I Building codes and county safety laws aim to safeguard life and property. A landlord's neglect in obeying these laws, ; s a rule can make him liable for ~Y 'injurie~ that others suffer as a result:
Thus, • many state and local rules control. Whether .the agreement says so or 11ot, these written laws often become an unwritten part of a contract. The California Division of Industrial Safety puts out safety regulations; and tenants, business callers, or workers have a right to rely upon the property owner to obey them. The state housing l aws call for protection of health and safety in hotels, apartments, and dwellings. In certain cases this law may
REPORT FROM WASHINGTON
BY CONGRESSMAN ED REINECKE

By the time you read this, the Congre 1:
will hav6 been sworn in and .the membezis
back at work in our nation's capital. ,
During the coming months you will read .
and hear about the votes and bills before the
House and the Senate.
Following are some frequently asked ques
tions concerning the workings of the Con
gress.

How are votes taken in the House?
In four.different ways. Usually the Speaker
puts the question in this form; "As many
as are. in favor (of the motion} say 'Aye/ "
and then, "As many as are opposed. say
'No.'" In most instances, the vote takeh
is decisive enough to satisfy. But if the
Speaker or any Member is in doubt, or,if
it sounds close, any Member may ask for
a division. Iri this case, the Spe8;ker as~s
those in favor to stand up and be I counted;
then those opposed to ~he proposition tp
stand up and be counted. The Speaker doef>
the counting and announces the .result. B~t
if there is still doubt, or if a demand is
made by one-fifth of a quorum --that isl,
20 in the Committee of the Whole or 44
tn the House --tellers are appointed to make
the count. The two tellers take their place
at the' head of the center aisle. All Members
favoring the proposition walk between the
tellers~ and are counted. Then those op
posed walk between and are counted. This
vote settles most questions.
If a roll call is ordered, the Clerk reads the names of the whole membership, and as his or her name is callel::i, the Member answers "Aye" or "No." The names o. those . not voting the first time are read .a second time, so that Members in corridors, cloakrooms, committee rooms oroffices, have been notified of a rollcall by signal bells, may come in and vote.
What is ' 'pairing'' ?
In the House, a pair is a written agreer ment between Members on opposite sides not to vote on a specified question or during a stipulated time. It is in effect equivalen to . a vote on the part of each against the proposition favored by his colleague. It is' available to Members desiring to preserve. their vote or the vote of a colleague
during absence from the House. The practSQe appeared in the House of Representatives as early as 1824. It was not officially recognized in the House rules until 1880: at pre..,
sent, pairs are announced by the Clerk and published in the Record. t
Pairing is also practicep and permitted in the. Senate_ although not. recognize.ct by the rules.
wAsH1NcroN ANa Small

,•_,,,. ~

Business
~f
BY C . W I L S O N H A R D E R
Coeducational Advertising

The businessman who adver- After the nation's employe,:ii
tises for secretary, lingerie sales had digested this regulatio,f
person or manicurist should not the Equal Employment Oppo-lj-,
be surprised if men turn up at tunity Commission turned 1k
his doorstep asking for inter- the newspapers and told thev
views. From now on, advertise- that division of . ads betwe~}:
ments for garage mechanics and "Male" and "Female" classiff
stevedores may bring women cations would henceforth €
applicants. . * * * forbidden. l;Iowever, its ne'1 regulation d{d permit groupi1iE
At least that appears to be under headings, "Jobs of In
the goal of the government'fll terest-Men" artd "Jobs of Int
new regulations on 'newspaper terest -Women," explainin11
want ads. An order from Wash- that this did not exclude inter
lngton requires that newspapers no longer run job ads under est by the opposite sex.* * *
male and female headings, Perhaps at this point, the bu-
which is now considered a vio reaucrats at the EEO Commis•
lation of the Civil Rights Act sion were taking bows for in
prohibition on sex discrimina creasing the number of female
tlon in employment.* * * truck drivers. Susan B. An• thony, were she alive, wou•d
A consensus of newspaper ad have been ecstatic. But then,.a
managers is that this will be a group called the National Orr
disservice to the job-seekers. * * * ganization of Women filed su_li against the Commission charg-
But it's also one of the most Ing its regulations still permit
absurd Federal decrees ever ted discrimination, and tile
issued. It's the climax of a four- Commission, giving in, issuecJ
act bureaucratic farce.'~ * * new guidelines that prohlbi1 any ,separation of ads,, exce1t
First of all, when Congress where "sex is a bona fide occj
was considering the Civil Rights Act, this sex discrimination section was proposed by pathmal qualification," such a~ for a model or actor. * * *
the opposition to delay or de- This will make job-huntliw
feat its passage, a common stra more tedius than ever. Womep
tagem on Capital Hill. But, low wm have more ads to wa~
and behold, Congress in its through. It will also tie a, har1•
haste to legislate passed the bill ship on the businessman aljl
without deleting this section. yet it will not alleviate ~~
'~ ,~ ,~ Administration of the job dis- called "jobdiscrimination"at al .* * *
criminatlon law fell upon the Freedom of the Press ls e:M•
Equal Employment Opportun tolled as an American virtu~,
lty, Commission. At . first, It and yet a little bit of this fre~
ruled that an employer could dom has given way to regula
not use any statement of sex preference, such as "Sales posl tlon, regimentation and restrlction. Are these the three RJs
lion for experienced. man .. . " the government is teaching?

(c) S11tinnul F't>dnation of Tndeoendt"nt Bu~ineR~

,,
_
1ht Old


.well be part of leases for such \ places. .

"Change is exciting...espe
Note: Californislawyers of
cially when someo~e says t,o

-.fer this column so' you may
'keep it!' "

know about our laws.
Most men, it seems, enjoy Answering one question W!th There are .Ql foreign gov-. a change of lipstick flavor another is often a wayto avoid ernment tourist offices innew once .in a while. telling the truth. .York City.

Efe_gant DISTRESSED 5 Piece
.#, ...

RECORD PRESS -Wednesday, January 8, 1969:PAOI 5
New Library Holiday Fun, for Jan. 15 DeadlineFor Annual Battle of Bands:
Bands, -combos, vocal
at ,Placerit'a _ Canyon Quail ofParks and Recreation; must' Additional information may
groups and vocal soloistshave
have reached their 13thbirth-be obtained by phoning theProves Popular until January 15 to enter Los day prior to Jam1ary 1, and County Parks and Recreation
The' Canyon Quail 4-H Club Angeles County's loth Annual not be 21 before July i, the Battle of the Bands Unit atWith the reopening of Place-enjoyed a Christmas party on

Battle of the Bands, according
supervisor explained. 749-6911, Ext. 553. rita Junior High School in the evening of December 23 at
to supervisor Warren M.
September, there were the the Caravilla Trailer Court iii

Dorn.
questions and comments' of Soledad Canyon. The recre

youthful amateur and non
both faculty and students, ation room was used at the

union contestants who survive
for during the summer the invitation of Mr. and Mrs.


OPEN FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P .M.
auditions will "battle" with
Instructional Materials Cen-Irvia, the managers of the

song and music dilring preter had bee moved to lar~ trailer court. Eric Lemmons,.
liminaries for the chance to
NEWHALL CARPET & DRAPERIES
ger, centralized quarters. Ted Lemmons, and Ruth Bo-
The move was a big one-hannon organized games for not only physically but also the party. as a part of the continuing The 4-H'ers and their little growth and development ofthe brothers and sisters helped instructional program. The break a pinata. Teri Brown, old library seated 38 students, the program chairman, prehad a capacity of approxi-sented the entertainment. mately 5000 volumes, and al-Mrs. Walter Lebs read a lowed no provision for audio-story that was brought to life visual equipment or small by the acting of Gall-Bone 111, group instruction. Textbook Stephanie Lebs, and Tammy distribution and audio-visual Walker. Jill Topping and Audequipment and materials cir-ra Leb s sang Christmas culation were-handled from the carols. The refreshment comLibrary Annex , a portable mittee provided punch and building physically separated a special Christmas cake for from the main library. This the 70 guests.
situation created real pro-The club entered its first blems in the toal use and float in the storybook Christefficient management of the mas parade in Newhall. It was operation. . a train of little red wagons,.
The move has increased each portraying a project. 4student capacity to 78 and H'ers in each project had deadditional shelvin~ .has in-. s_igned and decorated one creased the tot a1 potential wagon. The float earned a seccap a city to approximately ond place in thenon-commer8 000 volumes. A reference cial, under 16 division.
' a~ea has been created to allow for centralized housing of \ The officers of the Canyon the ready reference collec-Quan 4-H Club for the coming tion. Usingtheexisting folding year are president, Eric Lem
-walls in the new area, a small mons; vice-president, Terri group teaching area has been Browl'l; secretary, Ruth Boincorporated into the design. hannon; treasurer, Jlll TopThis area has been well used ping; reporters, Becky Dunn for library in~truction and and Beth Bonelli; song leaders, other small group activities. Stephanie Lebs and Lou Moore; The Library Annex is now recreation, TedLemmons and directly nextdoor, providing C hrist Y Hicks . The local greater integration in the use leader is Mrs. Jim Hart. of instructional materials, as physically isolating from the
The U.S. Army controls theInstructional Materials Cenmost real estate, in dollar ter the noisy activity of audiovalue, of any of the Governvisual equipment moving.
mental Departments. The JusLibrary use by students and tice Department controls thefaculty has incr.eased by about
least.
20 per cent; a book circulation has increased from approximately 1200 volumes a month .to 1500 v o 1 um e s a month. The use of audio.'.. visual materials (other than 16 mm. films) has1 grown,
primarily because teachers and students can now see all instructional materials on a g1v'en subject at one location.
'
A.

perform from the stage of
Hollywood Bowl, he said.
Our 7th Yr. In Newhall
Three finalists frlttn each division ---School . Dance
24307 San Fernando Rd.
Bands, Dance Bands, Combos,
Vocal Groups, andVocalSolo
P-hone 259-1377 For Estimate
ists ---will be judged during the culminating evening Bowl program slated for June 27.
SHOP & COMPARE
Applicants who wish to enter the county-wide musical com
Carpets• Draperies• Upholstering
petition, sponsored by the Los
Angeles County Department
~,,om\\" SNopp,-11
IS C,r'S/

OUR
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' .
I •
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'
PAGE 6 ;'RECORD P~ESS -Wedn_esday, January 8; 1969
. I
Reinek~ Seeks Top Medal For.Astronauts Aluminum Now Used For Phone wires
Five billion feet of new alu-plentiful. The decision for re-Originally, copper itself
Congressman Ed Reinecke, was of such a daring nature "Their motivations can b~ to risk their lives under c'onquer the dangers of a trip
minum conductor cable will gular production of aluminum was a substitute. In the 19th
27th District, has introduced that I feel certain all Amerattributed to man's constant orders as .are men in com-to the moon. Now others will
be •manufactured annually for cable does not mean the aban-century iron and steel con
legislation calling for the icans wich to recognize their search for knowledge even bat, yet risk them they did follow and land on the moon's.
the Bell Systemby April,1970. donment of copper for this ductors were used for tele
awarding of . the Medal of gallantry by awarding them at the risk of his life. But -willingly , courageously , surface.
1 Copper has served as the purpose, or necessarily a re-. graph transmission. Copper
Honor to the three moonthe Congressional Medal of in' today's world of securitysplendidly. "Their courage, theirdedi
standard electrical conductor duction from its current level wire at the time was not
flight astronauts, Frank Honor; the Americanpeople s eek in g men , astronauts "Nor do men in combat cation to man's progress,
since the late 19th cen~ury. Development of aluminum strong enough to support it
Borman, William A. .Anders should grant our highest Borman, Anders and have to face ~he awesome their tenacity in the face of
The introduction of aluminum conductor cable began in 1965, self between poles. Following
and James .A. Lovell, Jr. honor . to thos e who have Lovell are rare indeed. and fearful infinity of outer overwhelming odds deserve
in cable pro'ctuction is being and resulted in new splicing the invention of the telephone
In remarks included in the furthered the -knowledge and "These men trained for spa_ce. Human fear is recognition.'' '
made for two reasons: the and sheathing techniques to in 1876, similar wires were
Con gres sion al Record, humane pursuits of. mankind. months to prepare for their greatest, after all, when man
fluctuating price of copper on meet the problem of conductor. used for-voice transmission.
Reinecke said that the Medal "The s e three Arnerican hi s t10 ri c mission . Their faces th e unknown . This
dom; stic and world markets, joining and corrosion. Those
h a s , i n th e pas t , be en space pione e rs splashed performance was not spurfear our moon astronuats The narrowest railroad
and an uncertainty in its were two areas of concern Bob JonesColleg&ofGreen
aw a r d e d only to thOSEJ who down in the Pacific Ocean of-the-mo men t heroism conquered without flinching. gauge used for commercial
supply. in the 1950s when an amount ville,.S. Carolina trains more
have distinguishedthemselves after a fantastically suc~gainst an enemy that leads "Borman, Anders and hauling is 23 1/2 inches, and
' Aluminum, in contrast, has of pulp-insulated aluminum ministers and missionaries
in war-time combat. '/Howcessful voyage around the to a heroic deed: The three Lovell believed that man's is used in Pa~istan, Wales,
had a price both lower and conductor cable was made arid t)lan any other American col
ever, the astronauts' deed moon. astronauts were not required ability and knowledge could India and South America.
steadier. Also, the supply is installed by the Bell System. . lege.


SHOP
BIG CLE

JANUARY ~ill_..._.
STARTS THURSDAY 9 A.M.
LADIES LADIES ITEMS-LADIES
SWEATER CAPRI

LADIES MEDITATION SHIRTS
DRESSES
Prints & Values to
.' 9
SETS

Plains $3.99 SPECIAL (:100% Acrylic Fabrics , Broken Styles
9
Stripes~and Plains, and Size in the

BUY~ BUNCH AND MEDI TA TE
Completely Washable Small Group
and Good Looking " Values to $8. 98

REG. . LADIES SHIFTS
SPECIAL
$4.98 '
$2 99

Values /o . : . , ._;$1 9 Cll.
SPECIAL

. $5.99 SPECIAL . , > Only a.few left in this odd


lot but they are cute.
LADIES CAPRI TOPS
LADIES QUILTED
& SWEATERS
DUSTERS
Broken Style and Size Range

Bright and REG. .. $399Colorful
. $5.99 'PECIAL
SPECIAL

Prints
T


A WHALE O_F A BUY
9 9 (:

Broken Styles Vaf.ues to
and Sizes1 $17.~5 SPEC_I Al Cute Prints Reg.
LADIES DRESSES

witb .Belts $2.98 Odds &
LADIES SKIRTS SPECIAL 9 9 (:
Values to
9 9 (:

LADIES SHORT SETS $3.98 '
Ends . SPECIAL LADIES_ Lots .of Styles Values .to
SPECIAL
and Colors $3.98
SHORTS LADIES Turtle
Values to
9 9 (:

SWEATER SHEL"LS N:~ck.s; , $4.915 SPECIAL . Sleeveless Reg.
Wild Pri_nts $2.98
LADIES BLOUSES
SPECIAL 99c:

Values to
GIRLS DRESSES ' SPECIAL9 9 (:
$5.98
MENS "JAZZY" "l+ike
Values to
$1 99

TURTLE NECKS Wow" $6.98 SPECIAL 11 Cotton
GIRLS Reg.
Knits

ONLY $3.98
DRESSES SPECIAL $1 9 9 11 LADIES
Values to
SPECIAL 9 9 (:

ONLY SKIRTS $4.98
SORRY NO REFUNDS OR
. .--. . . .
..,;ii;J@iiUt.i~ti'
BOYS ITEMS
.... .....
n n

.BOYS PLASTIC JACKETS s i z es 3 to ' 7 o N L Y . $1 .9 9
Reg. $3.98 Special .....•.•..
BOYS CORDUROY SPORT COATS
Sizes 8 to 20. Values
$79 9

to $13.98 Special ...••. 1 ••.•
GIRLS NEHRU SHIRTS
Knits and cotton prints. Values
9 9 (:
to $3.99 Special ............ BOYS FLANNEL' PAJAMAS Sizes 6 to 16prints. Sorry sold
Values to
$119

"AS rs," slight irregulars.
GIRLS SWEATERS $4.99
Rei:-. $1.98 Special ..... .. . . .
,\' ... Good Size Out Goes the
$299
Range Entire Line!
BOYS PRINT SWEAT SHIRTS GIRLS PLASTIC SUITS & JUMPERS Crazy Saying shirts in boys
39

sizes. Also great for girls.
$1

Only broken sizes left. Values Reg. $2.49 Special •...•...•.

,,:~ . $ 2 9 9
to $4.99 Special ........... .
:->.~ :,.
. .:•~ ;,. ,
BOYS SWEATERS


, ¥ "TEENS" PURSES
',; I

01'\lY a .feyt l~f~, .out they go.
".ire~t. c~l.~E~. s,hOlJlder type. I s"' 19 9
•,ci M any cute styles. Values Sizes ~ t:o ?O. Values $299
All►, .

to $4.99 Special ....•...•....
..~;-1 ,t~$3.;98Special.~.: .. ..:. . ... • ' . .:.,,~ 'l,•''
:~ : = ITEMS ____,,_,.,--______,.
-----MENS
MENS SWEATERS
MENS PANTS
Odds 'n Ends -Striped Odds 'n Ends -Good Color

High Styling -Mostly Orlon $ 39 9
-,
r',

REG.
Values to $9.98 . SPECIAL . .
$5.99
-MENS SHIRTS
Long & Short Large Patterns Sleeves Asst. & Colors
All
values to SPECIAL $149
Sizes tr98 .
3 FOR $4.25
:,'.•.\~_;:. .
• ,•,r~~ ,-.: :,

-~ ':r,::
.....,•~.:,,

MENS SWEAT SHIRTS
S~ort Sleeves -Fancy Neck Trims
I
REG. $139
$2.19 SPECIAL
,

ri
Household Items
• YARDAGE Odds _'n SP.ECIAL , <
.

Ends 29(: I.•
Val~es to $1.49 YD .
WOOLEN YARDAGE
Wide Widths
$169 '
Values to $3.98
UPHOLSTERY & DRAPERY
YARDAGE
Odd Lots -Many Cohama
Prints -Most 54 inch
Original $5.98 .
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259-1257
DRY .GOODS STORE
BANKAMERICARD.
HOURS: Mon. -Sot., 9 a.m~ 'to 6 p.m. .PMiii
24335 San Fernando Rd. DOWNTOWN NEWHALL




Miss JEANsw1Fr


Once again, at Yuletide, the Los Angeles Flying Club held its gala Christmas party atthe Va1enc i a Golf Clubhouse. Merrymaking, doorprizes and delicious food was enjoyed by _members and guest who came from all parts of the country. Johnny Ennis's eight -piece band prov ided music for dancing. Local members enjoying the festivities wereMr.
Yule Dinner for Flying Club
and Mrs. Dewey Webb.
Members of the flying club have flown.many types of aircraft both here and abroad. There are also several ,(Ilem-. bers who have just received their pilots licenses.
The purp©se of the club is to keep interest alive both in private flying and the history of private flying. Sine~
retirement, anumberof mem
bers have acquired old aircraft and have completely rebuild them.
The club has four pilots that are still flying 707 and DC 8 jet airliners. The oldest pilot in the club is Waldo Waterman, who has been flying for 5 4 years, Dewey Webb started flying 49 years agp and holds the lowest license num
259-9084
ber 273, AEM 495, Parachute

SAN FERNAN DO RD. at 9th ST.
II. Marty Jensen won second
Mon-Tues-Wed 119 Thurs•Fri•Sat 11•10 place in the 1927 D_ole race
Sundays 128 . --from San Francis o,to

3 DAYS ONLY .THURSDAY FRIDAY &SATURDAY 14-K DIAMOND TRIO
REG. ,$99. 9,5
I
$4995


For All Three

• Diamond ~ngagement ring
• Ladies' matching wedding band i Gent's matching wedding band

FINE CROTON WATCHES 1/3 OFF
EXCLUSIVE 3 YEAR GUARANTEE
Jean Swift Chi Psi
Engaged Celebrates Yule
Mrs. Alice M. McCarty of The holiday activities ofChi Newhall has announcedtheen-Psi Chapter of Beta Sigma
-gagement of her daughter, Phi Sorority included a busiJean, to Mr, Michael David ness me~ting and a gala dinKolesar, son of Mr. and Mrs, ner party, Joseph N. KolesarofWyoming,
Pennsylvania. , The business meeting, conMiss Swift is a graduate of ducted by the vice-president
Carson High School in TorMrs. Duane Gartner, was held rance and was an honor stuat the home of Mrs. Vernon dent at HarborJuniorCollege. Swindall. The group decided
She is presently employed by to donate to Father Garrett's the P a c ifi c Telephone and Boys as their holiday philanTelegraph Company in the thropic project. Mrs. Eugene Newhall office. • Ball!f announced that a SouthHer fiance lsservingaboard ern Californiawoman had been the USS Valley Fo'rge. made a national honorary -The wedding will take place member of Beta Sigma Phi. -in W¥om ing, _Pennsylvania, Dr. Elta Pfister, director of upon his return from VietNam, child guidance for Burbank City Schools has been given this distinction. Members
• . made reservations for the SanSaugus Swingers Fernando Valley Council's
.
Swing Saturday
The Saugus Swingers, the new teen-age square dance group will have the popular valley teen caller, Mike Seastrom, ' calling for them on January 11.
Little Joe Gurnaby fans are invited to join .the group at their dance on February 8 when he will be the caller.
Jime Hart calls every fourth Saturday of the month except February 22 when it will be dark because of the holiday.
The Saugus Swingers meet every second and fourth Saturday at Sierra Vista Junior High 19425 stillmore Avenue, sau~s (back of Safeway Shopping c enter). All teens are



REMINGTON"66" E LECT H J('
S ll .-\\' Ell_
Beautiful

0 Canister
N
.Sets
L y
$399 199
(PER ' SET

SHEAFFER PENS l/2 OFF

invited to join the group.
. son and Mrs. JoanStuart.

Yule Meet,ng for Womans Club
Santa Claus appeared to add of gifts. The group sang to the festivities of the annual Christmas carols accom-Christmas meeting of the panied by Mrs. Maude Larson Newhall Woman's Club. First on the piano. Mrs. Ethel Rusvice president, Mrs, Mary sell gave a reading,"AChrist
Booth, presided inthe absence mas Guest," of the president, Mrs. Addle Kee, who was ill. The club voted to donate
• Program chairman, Mrs. toward theCoordinatingCounVirginia Frew, assisted by cil Christmas Basket project. Mmes Connie Butler andIrene The next meeting ofthe club Roll\.ero, also hostesses, led wlll be held at 1:30 p.m., on
clubhouse. • Valentine Ball, which will be a dinner dance held inthe Empire Room of the Sportsman's Lodge. Mrs. Joan Stuart will be Chi Psi's Valentine Princess and represent them at the ball.
The hostess ofthe chapter's annual Christmas party was Mrs. Duane Gartner. After a festive dinner, the members J exchanged Christmas gifts which revealed the identities of each members' secret sister. The following members then chose new secret sisters for 1969: MmesEugene Ballif, Robert Fenter, Thomas Frew, Duane Gartner, Walt Hauss,
Warren House, Richard Kost,
Bud Larimer, Bud Losier,
Michael McGrath, Jay Moli
nar, Roger Morey, William
Ross, Vernon Swindall, Wil
liam Thompson, WilUam Don-

RECORD PRESS -Wednesday, January B. 1969 PAGE 7
I
I .
I I
---~ ,:

_____,iaf


I •J! 19.50
2 00
\l\11) • :::::::::::: 2s.oo
\ \

I • ---------------~--
\ MENS RACER TYPE P,ANTS
\ Regular Prt<:e Regular SALE PRICE / Price OO ,,,"'
',6.00-7.50...3.50 8.00-8.50...7 / .
' 8 oo ,,,"'/
, Regular Price
', 9.00-10.00-11.00... • ,,, "'
' ,,,
' . ,,,
',., __ .,,,.,,,,.
........._______ ___
-MENS SPORT SHIRTS
Long and Short Sleeves
REGULAR PRICE SALE PRICE
2.98-4.00.... 1.98
5.00-7:oo....... 3.50
:/ ,✓
,

BOYJS 7i.5~-?:?~,....••. :$.50 KNIT .SHIRTS
12.00....... 7 .oo
REG. V PRICE SALE PRIC!!
1.98 ... :.'."'' $1.49 2.50 -2.98 ........ $1.98
'

3.50. 4.50 .. ... $2.49
MENS KNIT SHIRTS
6:95 ... $2.98

.REGULAR PRICE
3.oo-4.50....... 5.00-7.so....... 8.00-10.00.......
11.00-15.oo.......
27.oo......••• I5.50
BOYS SPORT SHIRTS J
Long and Short Sleeves
REGULAR PRICE SALE PRICE
1.98-2.49......., I.SO 2.98-3.98....... 2.50 '
BOYS
Winter Jackets
REGULAR

SALE PRICE
PRICE

10.00-10.98...7.so
SALE PRICE
2.so
3.50
s.so
a.so
2.98
s.oo

9.00-10.00....... 7.00 12 .oo....~ ...... 9.00
\
ALL
NEHRU
SHIRTS
SO%
OFF REGULAR PRICE


NEWHALL Quality 'JEWELERS
MENS STORE
in

BANKAMERICARD in Downtown Newhall MASTER CHARGE DOWNTOWN
NEWHALL

24331 Nt SAN FERNANDO RD. 259-3444 •
. I .

./
I /

PAGE 8 RECORD PRESS -Wednesday, January 8; 1969

Bobbie......
'

.LL--------~~-~~~~~--------
Hope you all have your Christmas decorations down and packed away for Twelfth Night will have passed by the time you read this issue and woe to those who have been lazy and not dispensed with the Christmas past for bad luck will dog you all year!

In spite of the flu bug so very prevelant in our valley, throughout the holiday there' were still parties galore and parties well
attended. Everyone seems to have scheduled
their few days in bed with the flu bug very
well!

Jim and Thea Neiss hosted a New Years Eve party at their beautiful Sand Canyon home. Thea's brother and family, the Elmer Webers of Sunnyvale were special guests.
The hill-top home of Dick and Lynn Alexander in Oak Springs Canyon was the scene of another fun New Years Eve party. Mike and Lee Bello, who have just moved intp their new home in Grass Valley were ther to greet many old friends. Dick .and Lynn flew up for a visit with them last week.
There was the big Booster Club party at the Glass Bottle Blowers Clubhouse anp also in Saugus George and Arlene Wright entertained with a party in their home.

Friendly Valley of course held their gala annual New Years Eve party in the auditorium--where so many people have so much fun!
Guests enjoyed dancing in the Newhall Hilton Garden Room (their enclosed patio decorated with stars, flowers and potted plants) at Richard and Barbara Giamo' s party. Part of the decor were two unusual Christmas trees, one in shocking pink and pale pink was de- corated with costume jewelry and chandelier crystals and the other decorated with antique gold jewelry. The party was complete with a New Year's baby appearing at midnight in long underwear, diapers and a top hat!
Other Newhall parties, all gala affairs were
Al and Fern Stephani hosted a holiday party on December 28.
Friends and neighbors 'enjoyed dancing and games at the home of Tom and Helen Cunningham.
Jim and Carol Bahara hosted a New Years Day buffet breakfast. Amid much hilarity guests exchanged white elephant gifts on December 27 at Dick and Jan Neenan's fun party. ,
Bob and Mary Funk became the parents of a new daughter on December 29. Her name is Stephanie Marie and she weighed 5 pounds 3 ounces. Andrea and Tamara are her very proud sisters.

The Prairie Dogs enjoyed carolling on December 23 as part of their Christmas party. This wa.s followed by games, dancing and refreshments at the home of Marg Gerraro.
Gene and Maxine Doty hosted .their annual open house on New Years Eve for more than 70 guests.
Ed and Sue Barnhill and, family who are spending a year in Eugene, Oregon, were visiting iri town over'the holiday. '
In spite of the flu, David and Elvida Anderson's family gathered on December 29 for a belated Christmds. They were delighted to have all five grandsons present. '
Understand one lady on New Years Eve

. wearing a long formal skirt was not to be outdone by the cute mini-skirts present and turned her formal skirt into a mini ••• but forgot the kick-split in back!
Delta Alpha Xi Holiday Party
The sisters of Delta Alpha Brock who presented two Xi Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi hllarious pantomimes.

'Federal Community Room. quipa, . Peru, will be a spe-
SOCIETY
Bobbie Trueblood Society Editor

~-~
Open House


Honors Hadleys show slides and talk about
An open house was host-ed his country at their meeting
by Mrs. Shirley King and to be held at 7:30 pm, Thurs
family honoring the marriage day, January 9, at the Valley
of her father Mr. Carleton
•fiadley and Mrs. Pearl Cook. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley were for What It's Worth
united in. marriage on Decem
ber 11, in Las Vegas, Nevada.• Bell System researchersThE! ceremony took place at the Little Church of the West Algiers with Rev. Wayne L. Fussell officiating. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hadley have been residents of Newhall for many years, but plan to move to San Luis Obispo in the near future where they have business interests.
Mrs. King and Mr. FloydG. (Bud) Spots of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania were matron of honor and best man for the newly married couple.
MISS BARBARA SCHLAEGEL

Bar hara Schlaegel towed
The open house, held on . Sunday, December 29, was well attended by out of town
Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy W. Schlaegel of valencia are ananouncing the engagement of their daughter, Barbara Sue, to Mr. Richard Andrew Delia. The bride-elect was graduated from William S. Hart Union High School, attended Valley College, and was a former airline stewardess for Ameri-
Placerita PTA Woodlands
Meet
President, Mrs, RalphBell,

held at the homes of John and Molly Hintzen, will preside over the second Nate and Lola Olsen, Taylor and Pepper general meeting of the PlaPowell, Mel and Betty McSpadden and-Max cerita Junior High P.T.A. to and Joanne Koopman. be held at 10 a.m., January
14, in the home of Mrs. Ken-

The first annual New Years Eve party spon-neth Kreyenhagen, 15827Beasored by the Old Orc~ard Homeowners As-ver Run Road, saugus. sociation in Valencia was a sellout. Plans In line with the theme, are already being made for next years event! "Bridging the Gap---PTA", The Agajanians played for this popular party.' principal, Micheal Shuman,
• h and Mrs. Louise Robertson.
Don and Pearl LePage entertamed a ouse-school librarian will be in ful of guests all of which adjourned next attendance. Mr~. Robertson door to the home of Fred and Gail Becker. will describe the function of fo~ a New Years Day buffet breakfast. a junior high school library,
Bill and Madeline Rezo also hosted a party its facilities, and its goals where Jim Bachman delightfully entertained . on the campus. A queStion
and answer period will follow

guests with his guitar• so that all in attendance may "Aunt" Gertrude Clark and Caroly Kelley learn more about thi~ depart-served eggnog on Sunday afternoon. ment. . Colonel and Mrs. Patrick Mulcahy and A pot luck luncheon with a Colonel and Mrs. Basil Spalding invited guests •$1.~0 donation will be serv~d.
. . . \... All mterested parest:; are m-
to a c1v1c and command rec.ept1on on New Years vited to this meeting, located Day at Fort McArthur~ in the woodlands sand can-
Bob and Barbara Hunt and family enjoyed ,:on development. three days with Bruce and Pat Kelsey who now live in Clovis, near Fresno. The interesting Kelsey home is a 100 year old house that
-was owned by the superintendent of a copper
~~~e~::: Bruce is now managing the Har~ CDUR!R
International Sorority accom-A bountiful buffet was 1------------i
a,~
SAVE NOW
,
During Our
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
Starts
FRI :, JAN. lOfh
BOUTIQUE FASHIONS
2522935
18342 SIERRA
...:-JANUARY
_. SPECIAL
Every MON-TUES-WED throu&hout JANUARY
Per■a■e■ t . Wa,e
$1 050
NORMAL
HAIR

guests from Reseda, LaHabra, can Airlines. West Los Angeles, Westwood, Encino, Glendale, Burbank as
Mr. Delta was graduated

from Xaverian High School, well as Newhall and Saugus. Table decorations consisted
Brooklyn, New York and at

tended Holy Cross College, of a two tiered wedding cake Worcester, Massachusetts. and was servedwith coffee and punch.
He is currently enrolled in the Los Angeles County SherSpecial guests were Mrs.
iff's Academy, Anne Hogan from SanfaMaria, A wedding date of March and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hadl has been set. ley from San Luis Obispo.
58LQ
DISCOUNTS
TOYS
AND
SPORTING .GOODS
DEAN'S
HOBBYLAND -TOYS SPORTING GOODS ,Old Orchard Shopping Center 23413 Lyon• Ave., Valenc~a ' 259-3990
SHAMPOO _; and SET
SHORT HAIR

Miguel Chamorro, of Are-cial guest.
AFS Speaker
Mrs. Beth. GoodJn, president of the local chapter of the American Field Service, has announced that Taffy Adler, Hart High exchange student from South Africa, will

report that during a 70-year lifetime, an American spends one year talking on the telephooe.
The remainder of his life he, among otherthings, sleeps 20 years, eats four years, spends 18 months admiring himself in a mirror and only six months in church.
Jake a good look

UNITED'S NEW BONUS ACCOUNT PLAN MAKES SENSE
A United Bonus Account in combination with a United Passbook Account is the best way to get th,e highest possible earnings on your savings. The United Bonus Account Plan does not tie-up your savings, so you have everything to gain ... nothing to lose. Here's how this plan works to your benefit.
5¼%
BONUS ACCOUNT
Put the bulk of your savings, in multiples of $1,000, in a United Bonus Account. It is the highest earning Bonus Account available and the most flexible. The current annual passbook rate, 5% compounded daily, is paid every quarter. At the end of 3 years the bonus, currently ¼ % per year, is paid in one lump sum. Thereafter both regular and bonus earnings are paid quarterly. Funds fnay be withdrawn in multiples of $1,000 at any time and still earn the regular passbook rate-which is 25 % pigher than any comparable bank account~to date of withdrawal. The balance in your Bonus Account will stili qualify for the ¼ % bonus.
5o/n0
PASSBOOK ACCOUNT
Keep just enough money in your United Passbook Account for the short term goals you n~tmally save for. Your Passbook Account yields
5.13% when the current annual rate of 5 % compounded daily is maintained a year. Savings earn from day fund~ are received to day / withdrawn after 3 months. Funds in by the I 0th of any month, e,arn .• from the 1st. Earnings compounded daily, paid every quarter. Move , to United. Take advantage of the highest earning savings plan available. The.United Boors Account Plan.
United Savings Associations are members of $395 million strong United Financial Corporation of California and have accounts separately insured
I I
to $15,000 through the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation .
UNITED SAVINGS
The Choice of a Nation I
UNITED SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF CENTURY CITY• ASSETS: $103,000,DOO NEWHALL: 23760 Lyons Avenue
CENTURY CITY: Gateway East Building, 1800 Avenue of the Stars (Main Office) DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES: Statler Center, 677 S. Figueroa Street CULVER CITY: 5347 Sepulveda Boulevard SOUTH GATE: 3352Tweedy Boulevard


panied by their husbands, -served in thebeautifully deco-_ • Comp1ete Beauty . • Operptors: BETTY JEA
UNITED SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF CALIFORN IA • ASSETS: $285,000,000
drove to the home of Mr. and rated Brock home. & ROSE HODGSON ,,
Mrs. R. Brock, on December Those attending the affair . 2 5 2 _9 9 9 3 .,
' LOS ANGELES : 9800 S. Sepulveda Boulevard at Century (Main Office) ~ HO~ -s INGLEWOOD: 425 S. La Brea Avenue near Manchester
,U,.,.

21, for their annual Christ-were Messrs and Mmes F. ,••n OPEN MONDAY thru FRIDAY ... EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT . .,.'
CRENSHAW/IMPERIAL: 11350 Crenshaw Boulevard_ at Imperial .~, 111. -,r.masparty, Morrison,B,Smlth, F.Moor-.-, 17734 SIERRA HIGHWAY "'
NORWALK: 13906 S. San Antonio Drive near Norwalk Square _.., 11 •
Entertainment was pr&vided er, D. Woods, G. Conaway, and ,. ♦ by Mr. Gary Warshaurerand G. Warshaurer. Guests in-3/4 Mile from Solemint }unction . . . ~"~
Mrs, Carol Maurer with song eluded Dr. and Mrs, William &ll&U.LIL1a....;;..,....;;..__________________...,.,...,,_..,. an<t guitar and Mrs. Kathy Ross and M. Scannell.

~ECDRp ~~ESS -Wednesday, Janvary B, 1969 ,AOI 9
WE THANK YOU FOR A WONDERFUL YEAR!
I

IT WAS OUR PLEASURE TO SERVE YOU IN 168 ••• WE WILL TRY TO SERVE YOU BEffER IN 1691
=~~i~i:~~i: US:l).JJ. "C/wice "Steer /Jee/ lilBWE
,N~~CHIP

FULL CUT BONE-IN 0f), STAMPS
5 5

;~.~;~~;~~,~~'.'.''.'_;~~ • ou D STEAK
LUER'S PURE PORK-8-011:. l'k111.
4 $1
LINK SAUSAGE • • • • • • • • • • • Pkgs. RATH'S BLACKHAWK READY TO EAT
89'
SMOKED PORK BUTTS . • . . • . . . . • . • lb
~-----------------------~------~

:l)ef monle :l)offar :l)a'lj
FRUIT
5

TAIL 303
TINS FOR
COCK.

BONELESS
89¢

ROUND STEAK .... 1b
GRAPEFRUIT
303
4

1 s129
EYE OF TH E ROUND
SECTIONS .......T~! . . FOR STEAKS ............ ........... u.
BONE-IN ,
79•

RUMP ROAST ... .. .. .. . . . .. •
PINEAPPLE

4'6-0Z. TINS
3
BONELESS
FOR

GRAPEFRUIT. ~R~I: ~~l~K-STEWING BEEF ............ 79f.
I BONELESS SEAFOOD SPECIALS BONELESS
.GREEN 303 TINS
SIRLOIN TIP OR

5 _FOR ROUND HALIBUT
TOP ROUND

BEANS ...... /:E~;~ :r.c.u:
ROAST STEAKS STEAKSG-OLDEN
303 TINS . 'CREAM STYLE
CORN 5 FOR• 89~ 79~
I
99c
GARDEN

303 TINS
5 ,

. EARLY . FOR
PEAS ................ .
DEL MONTE



CATSUP
BIG 20-O.Z. BOffLE


FRESH FRO.ZEN -GENUINE . NEW .ZEALAND $PRING
s I
LEGO' LAMB
REG. 5I.ZE
GORDON'S-WHITE or WHEAT-I-LB. LOAF

PKG$
C

SLICED BREAD •~i. • • • • • • • • • • 25c MINUTE MAID -FROZEN 6-0Z. TINS •
-LB. JAR
s & F-I . , c ORANGE JUICE ..... 3 for 69c LB.PEANUT BUffER 39 BIRDS EYE -PEAS, CORN, CHOPPED BROCOLI or SPINACH NUCOA -REGULAR INCL. 2c OF_F C VEGETABLES • • • • , • • 6 ~tcZf$ I 00
89~

MARGARINE ......... .... ....... 25 .
I4-OZ. SIZE-INCL. Sc OFF GIANT SIZE -INCL. 12c OFF ALL GRINDS -I-LB. TIN
.AJAX
DASHj
C ~YUBAN CLEANSER DETERGENT COFFEE

_. _ PA
SUNN'f FRESH-QUART BOTTLES
3 '100

ORANGE JUICE . . QTS.
IMITATION ICE MILK

';JJ,licaf
e,Uen ';J)epf. ..S~ecia/.,
FUNFORALL
~~~ 35c
CTN.
l,U~lfOH DEP'I'.


ERS
LONDON BRIDGE-90 PROOF
DRY GIN.
53~!HS
LONDON BRIDGE -90 PROOF
DRY GIN $3.99 QT.
LONDON BRIDGE

JANE ANDERSON-LONGHO RN 8-0Z. ; MONTEREY CHUNKS
CHEDDAR .... .... 45': JACK CHEESE .. 69•
SCOTCH

OL' VIRG INIA-PICKLE & PIMIENTO 6-0 Z .. OLIVE & PIMIENTO 6-0 Z.
53~!HS

iNU'NCli°'MEATS~~ ... 3 '"Gs. s1°


. PRICES EFFECTIVE_THURS. THRU SUN., JAN. 9. I 0, I I, 12 24200 LYONS A VENUE 2 68 7 7 BOUQUET CANYON ROAD 259 -7440 NEWHALL 259-6150 SAUGUS

RECORD PRESS -Wednesday, January 8, 1969
OBITUARIES
I
James Hunsicker

Private funeral services
HO TOY'S
were held December/ 31 for
James Henry Hunsicker of
C~;,.,u :J.ood
22619 Chaparro Drive, Saugus1 who passed away suddeilly the previous Saturday. Hil
:Jo qo
lb.lQIJPt Cm. art
SAUGUS, CALIFORNIA
burn•s Funera:! Chapel dir-
Phone , (805) 259-7111
ected. Interment followed in Eternal Valley Memo r I a1 Park.
He was born January 15, 1915, in Athens, Ohio. At
the time of his death he was transportation supervisor for the Saugus Union School District, and was very popular with the youngsters h~ drove back and forth to school.
l
He is survived by his wife, Ajuana; a daughter, Melanie_
Schrock of Saugus; a brother, La Verne Hunsicker of Ohio
Qeck Yow l1Ni11 Storts llit..
la THE RKORD lid Week
and three grandchildren.
BUSINESS aml

ii YOUR SHOPPER'S GUIDE

PROFESSIONAL

ALL CRAFT BUILDERS

MASTER PLANNING --~ ~STOM INSTALLATIONS,,.• Swimming Rlol Design
, • 8-B•Q's & Waterfalls .• Wrought Iron-Sprinklers Material' Supply Yard 7,,,,,e Landscape-Design and Materla Is ; L• Patio Roofs, Wood and Aluminum ~• Fences, Wood and Chain Link •• Block -Wal Is, Custom or Plain
• Concrete Slabs Brick and Tile
17843 SIERRA HIGHWAY• 252-3212 • (113)3655411

. KEN'S CANYON 252-0~..
84
MUFF~RS & WELDING '"': 1,

ACETYLENE -ARC • STRUCTURAL


ORN. AMENTAL IRON SERVICE -PIPE LINE Open 'til 6 Every Doy -All Doy Sot.


16765 SIERRA HWY. (2 miles N-Solemint Jct.\ SAUGUS


un1en oil products
All Your Petroleum Needs "BOB" & "SOLLY" Only Major Repr,esentatlon LAGER BERG in the vai ley Since 1945 24029 San Fernando Road, Newhall 259-7600 259-1409
( ,

Go Go ~ 805-259-044-'
Newhall Tire Company
BRAKES .,, ALIGMENT
R.E "RAY" SHELLY 24300 SAN FERNANDO l? D, OWNER NEWHALL, CALI"' .
TRASH & JUST ABOUT
LEE WAYS
TREASURES EVERYTHING
USED FURNITURE STORE
AL&BOB 805-252-1818 USE YOUR 17052 Sierra Highway, Sauqus e of A We buv and sell furniture. a~Ilances, whatnots, too.ls, electric motors, etc••

ASSOCIATED FENCE CO.
CHAIN LINK FENCE SPECIAUST
RANCH ES-RESIDE NC E-INDUSTRIALCOMMERCIAL
17000 SIERRA HWY., SAUGUS, CALIFORNIA BILL JONES DIAL 252-2600 • EM 5•7100
.,
,
Charlotte Eggleston
Charlotte ElizabethEggleston, 246211/2 Arcadia st., Newhall, passed away Thursday in San Fernando. She was born January 16, 1880, In Stanley, England.
Funeral services took place Saturday morning at the Cahpel of the Oaks with the Rev. Robert Spence officiating, and Hilburn•s Funeral Chapel dlr
ectlng. Interment followed in Eternal Valley M_,emorlal Park.
Mrs. Eggleston is survived' by two sons, Eldon Eggleston of Jamestown, N. Y., and Arthur Eggleston of Newhall; five grandchildren and ten
great-grandchildren.
. Dewey King Jr.
Dewey E. King Sr., of Sau
gus, passed away December 27, in Saugus. Funeral Ser


vices took place the following Tuesday at the Chapel of the .
259-6°11
Oaks under the direction of

NORDIC FENCE Community
Hllbu'rn•s Funeral Chapel.

Funeral Directors
24328 RAILROAD AVE ~
Elder Leland Hesseltine and

259-Ml 1 ~ PAUL EHRHART ~
Elder Robert Whitesett offi

I I:=_
~ HILBURN'S
ciated. Interment followed In Eternal Valley Memorial

• CHAIN LINK SPECIAL •
per
5' HIGH CHAIN LINK FENCE 99~ foot
Park. Mr. Kingwas born February

Funeral
INCLUDES: Labor , Chain Link, Top and Bottom 6, 1900, in Topeka Kansas.
Tension Wire, Line Posts.
Chapel
He was a ,mason for manyEnd Posts -$5.00 each; C_orner Posts $10.00 each; years and had last workedGates $18.00 each.

TELEPHONE 259-0808
for his son, Arthur.

NOTE: This price on 100 ft. minimum. Slightly higher
24353 N. WALNUT ST., NEWHALL
He is survived by his wife on hillsides and concrete slabs.

A CATES, l lNl;SLET, GATES AfflLIU(
Mildred; four sons; Dewey

.
King Jr. of Canoga Park, Ernest King of Reseda, Arthus .and LorettaM. Slack and.Juanita Morgan of Saugus, and Martha Bonetti of San Mateo.

Thi~ Space
$1.25

BACKHOE RENTAL
STAATS CONSTRUCTION
(805) 2_59-0807
A brother, Arthur King of Illinois' and two sisters, Bessie Traylor and Ethel Marg~ of ,Missouri and 20 grandchildren also survive.


PlaceritaRegular Baptist Church
22004 Placerlta Canyon .Rd., Newhall
SERVICES:

9:45 A.M. • Bible School 5:00 P.Jill. • Youth Meetings
11:00 A.M•.• Morning Worship 6:00 P.M. • Evenini Worship )tev: 'Richard-Seddiit 1P~stor 259-2913 :
First Baptist Church of Saugus
Temporarily Meeting At So_ledod Canypn School 9;45 A.M. SUNDAY SCHOOL 11 A.M_ WORSHIP SERVICE
5:30 P.M. YOUTH HOUR 6:30 P.M. EVENING SERVICE THURMAN FULLER, PASTOR 252-4233
Santa Clarita United Methodist Church
26640 ,ouquet canyon Rd.
Pastor
9:45 Sunday School'

Dr. Carrol I Wor'd
9:45 Morning Worship

NURSERY AVAILAB'LE
11:00 Morning Worship AT ALL SERVICES
Church Offl ce 259•1520 Saugus

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BOUQUET CANYON
Meetin2 at Rosedell School located ½ Block Frcm Bouquet Cyn. Rd. at American Beauty Homes.
Church services 10:45 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Donald Puerling, Pastor Ph. 2522334
First Southern Baptist Church
SUNDAY MORNING SERVICES Of Norh Oaks Sunda y School 9:45 am Morning 11am Evening 7pm Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7 pm
Pastor Dr. Lynn Lemon 252-4804 . 19554 Calla Way St., North Oaks
.
Church of the

THESE TIMES .••
Nazarene

O'(., ' .
Phone: 2595272 ,

. .'. . ~ ,.,/ ~~ ~ 24305 Lyons Avenue
-' • • .ii,. ?f,
Newho 11, CoIi forn io

GOD ISABtE=
Pastor, Sob Shearer

First Presbyteria1 Church of Newhall
. NEWHALL AVENUE AT MARKET
Rev. Robert Bingham, Pastor
9:30
a.m. ............... : . •.. . . . . .. Church School

9:30
a.m. and 11:00 .......•.•...• Worship Services Nursery care provided at all services.


Weekday Nursery School Monday -Friday (9 a.m. -noon)
Frie ■ dly Yalle'y C"o11 ■ unity Chuuh 1
Services: ,(United Metho.dist) Sunday Morning• 10 a.m. In the Frlendfy Valley c:ubhouse•.
Sunday School: 10 a.m. Prlnceu Parl< Shopping Center, P.astor: Friendly Valley Parkway. Eugene Prayer Meeting: 9:30 a.m . r.bnday, Photo Room. Clair Choir Rehearsal: 7:30 p.m, Tuesday-(Photo Room) Elmore, D.D.
BETHLEHEM LUTHERAN CHURCH
27265 Luther Drive,saugus
Offering a Christ Centered Pr ogram of Christian Worship and Education
Family Worship Services -8 a,m. and 10:30 a.m. 1 Sunday School for Children and Adults -!1:15 a.m.
Rev. David F. Thierfelder, Pastor -Phone 252-0622
.I

. RECORD PRES_,S -Wednesday, January 8, J9'69 1PAGE 11


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69(Evaporated 7/$1• . , .. SQ. CTH.
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VERMONT MAID _ .
ZEE WHITE OR COLORED . . THE POO FIGURES
°" MIX 'N MATCH NAPKINS PAKOF150.........I>
40 oz. JAR

--Ci ING HAM MY_-T-FINE . __ 15:(
': 1TREESWEET
PURR ALL TUNA

PEANUT BUTTER 39c PIE CRUST MIX
CAT FOOD 612.-OZ. CANS.. .........-...................... 9-0Z.
. ~-.
.,f ~rapefruit -21c 7 $,1
! JUBILEE
i ., Uuice 6 oz. . PREFORM 8 5 C _FIDDLE-FADDLt__ aQ7. 3-. s(
CHEESE LOAF . 2-LBS..............................:...:..
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. FLOOR WAX 40:0Z. CAN 79(. 4 9 C
-& .
POP-CORN SNACKS .
PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH ._ .. .
~ ., _BIRDS .EYE . /
-. ;KERNS . CASSEROLE MlXES .,.,..,,............................,,,,..,.,.
., . .
"'~ tCOOL 27c 6 5 C PREFORM PINl.01,~9(
~-7-~
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: AD PRICES IN !fFECT . . JAN. 8 THRU JAN. 14
NEWHALL STORE HOURS: CANYON Mon., Tues., .Wed., ThiKs., STORE HOURS and Sot., 9-7 9.9 Everyday FrL, 99, Sun., 9-6
----4 REASONS WHY!-
1. Our meats are the very best, cut to your needs wrapped for your freezer at no extra cost.
2. The freshest produce available anywhere.

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3. Our 7 day a week ad prices are the lowest.
4. Your patronage is appreciated and we really
try to please!

( Wher~;~*rie=n~~~erv~e ~ ?~~li-tL~.~~ ~c_!1!ss~
CHICKEN PAR-TS. TOMATOES ,..FREEZER tlEEI'
LECiS••••~•••••••••lb.-4 9 c_,

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Sides 59( Hind 69(
Of Beef Quarters
LB. 1.e•.
Solid Ripe
,BREASTS..........lb. -55'
\¥HOLE WHOLE
89( 69(
Beef Loins Le. Pork Loins LB.
WI NCiS•••.•••,••••• lb. 2 5 c
Red Rose Lb.
•!•.•CABBAGE
PORKASTEAKS 69l!

. .
.
Honey l.0af .. ,,,, .... 98( lb. ' Bolog11.1 .......••••. 65( lb. :\ mcric:rn Cheese 89( lb. A.LL MEA,T

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Fresh J.i ,er Sausage 69c lb. Ch,,ppecl H.1111 •. . 98c lb. Pepper I.oaf .••••• .. 79( lb: Family Loaf . ;.•98( lb.
SoHd Green

9(
Cotto Sal:.mi .•..•.•. 79( lb. Swiss Cheese .. ,98( lb. Spice(! J.u11cheon Loaf 65( lb. Sliced Boile:I , Lb~
.BOLOGNA 4,
Lb.
llr:nmsch¼eiger •••.• 79( lb. H.1m ••.••••• Sl.38 lb.
HUNT'$ DOLLAR. $ALE
WHITE FAMILY SCOTT
KREAMKRUST PARKAY OR WHEAT CATSUP _14 oz. ,n . .•
BATHROO.M ;MARCiERl,NE
STEWED>r~MATOES
B-READ
ioo S :
t TISSUE WHOLE TOMATOES "£AN . _ . ,oR
1 lb.
WHITE & COLORS 75°0Z. TOMATO' SAUCE; s~0~: Pkg• .
LOAF 2. . 1F. 0
. CAH CANS
4 Roll Pak
' TOMA TO SAUCE -8-0Z. CAN
8 .
WITH CHEESE-ONIONS-MUSHROOMS Or TOMATOES CANS
F.ROM THE. FREEZER HAWAIIAN 460z.3 $1 LIBBY'S Cf;tRNEI:) 4 3.. ~fROM~THE DEL( CAsE
.FRUIT PUNCH CAN FOR -~ PORK 'N .EANS , .• 2½CAN • ,5.C-ANS BEEF HASH .. lS½-OZ. • : '\' . '.;.
. I BAR M _'*' CERTIFRESH
BREADED 16 oz. 89(,•~YSOL DISINFECTANT $169 KERNS . 89C NABISCO WHEAT . . • T'RIAN,~ ~--~-... -4 :9 ~
j OR RICE 8½-0Z. ( ~ . . , ,
~TR.AWBERRY PRESERVES 30-OZ. JAR............
FISH FRY SPRAY CAN 21 oz. . 2 9 C HONE-vs 35..1 BACON ,LB. . .} f
FR~E WINNIE





HILLS BROS. COFFEE 1 lb. 73C 2 lb. $1.45" Blue Bonnet Margarine . • . . . . ••. . ... . • •. . . . • • •. •. . •••• . ••••. . ••••••••• •• . • ••. •...• 29~ Ore-Ida stew Vegetables .•...••....••; ; •. . .. .• .• , ........ ..• . . . . . . . •. ..•.... ..•..• 47~ Ore-Ida Pixie Potatoes, 1 1/4 lb. • .n ..... . ..................... . .. . ..... . ......... . 35~ Russet' Hash Brown Potatoes, 12 oz.....'... .... . ....; ......... ........ ......... 2/ 41~ Minute Maid Orange Juice, 6 oz. •.. , .. .. ....................... . ........... . ,.; . . . 2/ 59~ Minute Maid orange Julee, 12 oz. . ••. .. .. .••. •••: •••...•.•.•...•..•• ••.•••.••. .•.• • 57~ Van de Kamp Enchilada Dinners, all varieties •. 59~ Reynolds Wrap, standard Roll ', .. 3/$i Sara Lee Pound Cake •....• . . . . .• .. . ••. .... •• .• 89~ Gerber's strained, Juices •.. .. 3/ 39~ ..

PAN CAKE S~YRUP 24-0Z. BOTTLE.;....,.....::.......... LIQUID DETERCiEN~
CURTISS .
MARSHMALLOWS
10½-~z-19(

RATHS ,
BOlti&NALB, 59c
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DANISH ( .
COTTAGE •.. •.. 3- '1~-.
CHEESE. _. 16 oz. . . . __ .


THE SIGNAL NEWSPAPER

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Video: The First 100 Years, 1919/2019

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Surviving 1924 Issues

SEE ALSO:
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Randy Wicks Cartoon Collection

• Scott/Ruth Newhall
• Signal Staff Mugs


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A.B. "Dad" Thatcher Editor 1925/1938

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Truebloods' Print Shop 1950s

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6th Street Construction 1956

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Newhall Buys Signal 1963

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Production Building Burns 1969

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1986 Construction x9

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Special Edition: Creekside Opens 9/8/1986

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Special Edition in Memory of Scott Newhall 1992

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1994 Earthquake

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75 Years 1919/1994

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Signal Story 1919/1999

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Signal Photo Archive Donated to SCVHS 2019

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