Santa Clarita Valley History In Pictures
> PICO CANYON

Oil Tank Erected, Worker Killed, 1883.



Oil tank at left. Click to enlarge.

Webmaster's note.

From local historian Stan Walker come these news reports on the construction of a 20,000-bbl oil storage tank on the south side of the Pico Road in 1883. It's during this period we first encounter the name "Mentryville" for the oil town where Charles Alexander Mentry was the oil field superintendent.

The articles variously mention a 12,000-bbl and 20,000-bbl tank; the 20,000-bbl size is probably correct. Walker writes:

"The American Petroleum Institute (API) standard for a 20,100-barrel capacity tank (1 bbl = 42 gallons) is 60 feet in diameter x 40 feet in height. For a 12,100-barrel tank it is 52 feet x 32 feet. A modern 20,000-barrel tank is about 48 feet tall with a diameter of 55 feet and a footprint of 2,376 square feet.

"This is more than likely the large tank opposite the schoolhouse in the old photos of Mentryville. This tank was used for crude oil and not water. Water tanks would be closer to the wells and generally on high places."



Click to enlarge.

(Brief.)

Mr. B.D. Richardson inform(s) us that a force of boiler makers from San Francisco came down to the Pico Cañon a few days ago, and are now at work putting up a 12,000-barrel oil tank for the Pacific Coast Oil Company. When finished this will be the largest receptacle for the storage of crude petroleum in Southern California.



Click to enlarge.

Newhall Items.

Grain is being stored in the warehouse at this place at the rate of 600 sacks per day, and the estimated yield of this valley is 30,000 sacks.

All kinds of business is lively here, and several buildings of a substantial character are being erected.

The amount of freight handled at this depot is enormous, considering the size of the place and population.

A gang of sixteen boiler makers are now engaged in erecting a 20,000 barrel iron tank at Mentryville.

Car loads of lumber and iron of various kinds arrive here daily and are transported by a long line of teams to the oil regions. Derricks are being erected and pipe lines laid all over the mountains, and one would imagine that he was in Pennsylvania.

Petroleus.



Click to enlarge.

Accident at Pico Canyon.

(Special to the Herald.)

Newhall, Sept. 12, 1883.

This afternoon, while workmen were engaged in roofing the mammoth oil tank at the Pico Oil Wells, the staging gave way and five of the men fell to the ground, a distance of twenty-three feet. P. Ward was killed and G. Lamar, Chas. Hall, J. Heany and A. Brockley were wounded.

F.S.L.


PICO OIL CAMP

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CSOW Time Book
1887-1889

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SCV History Moment

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Early Oil & Gas Production in Calif. (Video 1985)

Standard Oil Co. History to 1929


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Description Jan. 1877

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Description May 1877

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Description 9-26-1882

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Oil Tank Const. & Death 1883

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Mentryville 1885-1891

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CSO Hill 1883

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Oil Works ~1885

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The Pico Field 1890

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PCO Hill ~1890s

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CSO Jackline Plant

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Farrar & Tufts Boiler

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Mentryville 1890s-1900s

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Reamer Patent 1900

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Machine Shop 1910

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Machine Shop 1910s

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Mentryville ~1920

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Pico No. 4, 1931

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CSO Jackline Plant

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PCO Jackline Plant Remnants

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Darryl Manzer at Firehouse ~1961

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Darryl Manzer at Field Office ~1961

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Pico No. 4, 1961

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PCO Jackline Plant Removal 1974-75

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CSO Jackline Plant 1974-75

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A.C. Mentry Blacksmith Forge

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