Santa Clarita Valley History In Pictures

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of Newhall.


 

Sanborn Fire Insurance map of Newhall, 1892. As noted, Newhall had no fire engines, no independent water wagons for fire suppression, and "not good" water facilities ... which might explain why George Campton's general store kept burning down. The two fire hydrants, located near the train station, are fed by a little 2-inch pipe from a 1,200-barrel tank located three-quarters of a mile to the north of this town of 200 souls.

North is to the upper left (more left than up).

Fir Street was renamed Walnut Street.

Maple Street (at bottom) was renamed Chestnut Street.

The inset at bottom left is out of place. It shows the northern extension of Fir (Walnut) Street to 9th Street and beyond. The second Newhall School, built in 1890 to replace the first Newhall School, which burned down in that year, was located in the center of a large parcel at the northeast corner of Fir and 9th Street. Today the location would be the north side of 9th Street between Walnut and the alley to the east. The first Newhall School sat on roughly the same spot.

The Southern Pacific Newhall train station is located at the northeast corner of Railroad Avenue and Market (7th) Street. It burned down in January 1963. By sheer coincidence, decades later, the Jan Heidt-Newhall Metrolink Station would be built on the same site.

Certain building owners are identified on the map. The Newhall Land and Farming Company is the owner of the warehouse that sat opposite the train station, at the southeast corner of Railroad and Market. It is remembered as the "potato warehouse," but we see that in 1892, it primarily stored wool and grain.

The commercial fruit-drying operation seen in this circa-1885 photograph is still in business. Note the "Stacks of fruit drying crates" and "shed" above (east of) the train depot.

The Pacific Coast Oil Company building is next to (north of) the train station. The two fire hydrants are on either side of it.

The saloon and billiard hall at the north end of Railroad Avenue is still a saloon today. Of course it has been modified over the years, but it's probably the oldest business location in town that still serves its original purpose. In the latter part of the 20th Century it was called the Rendezvous bar.

Buildings shown in yellow are of wood-frame construction.

Those shown in green are probably tents, including a small Chinese laundry in the alley bounded by Railroad Avenue, Spruce, 8th and 9th streets.

Campton's store is in the upper left quadrant, at the southwest corner of 8th Street and Railroad Avenue. The map shows the various portions of the building that were used for dry goods and clothing ("D.G. & Clo."), the Off(ice), and Gro(ceries).

The second Southern Hotel sits at the southeast corner of Spruce (now Main) and Market streets — right where El Trocadero Restaurant would be built 100 years later. The map shows the locations of the various functions within the hotel — office, bar, bedrooms, dining room and kitchen, with a water tank on a trestle. The hotel laundry is in a small, separate building.

The new wood-frame Presbyterian Church is shown directly at the west end of Market Street (bottom of map).

It appears Ed Pardee's house has already been moved (from Pine Street) to the triangular propery bounded by Newhall, Market and Fir/Walnut streets. (This area became Veterans Historical Plaza a century later.) We don't see Tom Mix's set pieces here because Mix and the movies were two and a half decades away.


Download archival .tiff image here.
RETURN TO TOP ]   RETURN TO MAIN INDEX ]   PHOTO CREDITS ]   BIBLIOGRAPHY ]   BOOKS FOR SALE ]
SCVHistory.com is another service of SCVTV, a 501c3 Nonprofit • Site contents ©SCVTV • Additional copyrights apply
comments powered by Disqus