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James A. Bartlett


Home of Record: Soledad Township (SCV)
Date of Birth:

Service: Army of the United States
Rank:
ID No: 39273316
Specialty: Aerial photography
Length of Service:
Unit:
Start Tour: January 1943

Incident Date: April 20, 1944
Casualty Date: April 20, 1944
Age at Loss: 29
Location: Mediterranean Sea
Remains: unrecovered

Narrative: Jim Bartlett of Soledad Township enlisted in the US Army in January 1943 and was trained for aerial photography. At age 29, Bartlett was aboard a US Transport ship in the Mediterranean Sea — probably the SS Paul Hamilton — when it was struck by an aerial torpedo on April 20, 1944. His remains were unrecovered. He is memorialized in the Tablets of the Missing at the North Africa American Cemetery, Tunisia, and he was awarded the Purple Heart.


About the North Africa American Cemetery
From the American Battle Monuments Commission:

At the 27-acre North Africa American Cemetery and Memorial in Tunisia rest 2,841 of our military dead, their headstones set in straight lines subdivided into nine rectangular plots by wide paths, with decorative pools at their intersections. Along the southeast edge of the burial area, bordering the tree-lined terrace leading to the memorial is the Wall of the Missing. On this wall 3,724 names are engraved. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. Most honored here lost their lives in World War II in military activities ranging from North Africa to the Persian Gulf.

The chapel and the memorial court, which contain large maps in mosaic and ceramic depicting the operations and supply activities of American forces across Africa to the Persian Gulf, were designed to harmonize with local architecture. The chapel interior is decorated with polished marble, flags and sculpture.

North Africa American Cemetery is located in close proximity to the site of the ancient city of Carthage, Tunisia, destroyed by the Romans in 146 B.C., and lies over part of the site of Roman Carthage. It is near the present town of the same name, 10 miles from the city of Tunis and 5 miles from its airport. The "La Marsa" railroad runs from the center of Tunis to Amilcar station, a 5-minute walk from the cemetery; taxicabs are available at Tunis and at the airport. There are good hotel accommodations in Tunis as well as in the vicinity of the cemetery at Carthage, Sidi Bou Said, La Marsa and Gammarth.

North Africa American Cemetery is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cemetery is closed on weekends, and U.S. and Tunisian holidays. GPS Coordinates: N36 51.918 E10 19.876.


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